Gallery 344

Students working at NuVu Studio in Central Square

Current Exhibition: In:Accessible

On View: January 8 - May 31, 2018

How do we make our community more accessible to all? In:Accessible, the new exhibition at Cambridge Arts’ Gallery 344, showcases projects created by students of NuVu Studio, a Central Square school where teens design and build solutions to real-world problems—like helping a teen in a wheelchair play basketball, creating a device to help a boy with  muscular dystrophy raise his hand in class, or helping a veteran who’s lost arms continue to practice archery.

“The students get to act like professional designers developing solutions to concrete problems that offer a way for an individual with a disability to be in the world as they wish to be,”Cambridge Arts Director of Public Art and Exhibitions Lillian Hsu says.

Founded by MIT graduates in 2010, NuVu’s educational framework is based on the architectural studio model—every term students dive into hands-on design, engineering, science, technology, art, and other fields in an interdisciplinary studio environment. NuVu is designed to foster students’ spirit of innovation. They use their curiosity and creativity to explore new ideas and make their concepts come to life.

During the In:Accessible exhibition, students will use the gallery as an active workshop to develop and show their projects. The students will explore and expand the notion of access in the public and private realms within cities. They will raise questions about how a city engenders openness, freedom, and opportunity for the people, animals, and plants who inhabit it. By looking at access through a variety of lenses (social, spatial, physical, physiological, psychological), In:Accessible illuminates potential connections that might allow people to transcend the barriers inhibiting participation.

In:Accessible also examines the rights and ownership of civic spaces: how transportation infrastructure (bike lanes, crosswalks, bus stops, T stations) can connect and disconnect residents; how racial and socioeconomic segregation grows in a city; and how gender identity can shape a place.

The City of Cambridge advocates for high standards of accessibility, but there is always more to do. We are excited to hand over this space to the students of NuVu to share their ideas, pose questions, and add to our understanding of what it means for a city to be fully accessible to all.

NuVu Studio:

In:Accessible Event Schedule        

Wednesday, February 28, 2018, 6:00-8:00 pm
End-of-Term, Winter NuVu Exhibit/Demo Day
Location: NuVu Studio, 450 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139

Monday, March 26, 2018, 6:00-8:00 pm
Gallery Reception and Conversation with NuVu Students
With Gary Dmytryk, Chair, Commission for Persons with Disabilities Advisory Board  
Location: Gallery 344, City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway, 2nd Fl.

Tuesday, March 27, 2018, 6:30 pm
Film Screening: Stumped, award-winning documentary directed by Robin Berghaus 
Co-sponsored by Disability Reframed and ReelAbilities Film Festival 
Location: Cambridge Public Library, main branch, lecture hall, 449 Broadway
Hosted by the Cambridge Commission for Persons with Disabilities 

Thursday, April 26, 2018, 5:30 pm
Film Screening: NuVu Student Short Documentaries followed by feature film, 
Edward Scissorhands
Disability Reframed is a community film series co-sponsored with Boston Commission for Persons with Disabilities.
Location: City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway, 2nd Floor Community Meeting Room

May 30, 2018, 6:00-8:00pm
End-of-Term NuVu Spring Exhibit/Demo Day
Location: NuVu Studio, 450 Massachusetts Ave, Cambridge, MA 02139

Gallery 344 is free and open to the public.

Gallery 344
Cambridge Arts Council
City Hall Annex, 344 Broadway, 2nd Floor, Cambridge, MA

Gallery hours
Monday 8:30am - 8:00pm
Tuesday - Thursday 8:30am - 5:00pm
Friday 8:30am - 12:00pm
Saturday - Sunday closed

Cambridge Arts Council Public Art Program

In accordance with Cambridge's Public Art Program, one percent of construction costs for capital improvements is designated to support the inclusion of integrated, site-responsive public art. Since 1979, over 200 artworks have been commissioned into the Cambridge Public Art Collection for the enjoyment of all who live, work and visit the city.